Step-by-Step instructions on how to access your property’s land unit and vegetation maps

Step 1 – Locate Your House

Follow the links below to the maps of your property location i.e. Eastside. Locate your street and house on the vegetation type map.

 

Step 2 – Identify Your Vegetation Type

Refer to the legend, which is located on the map and identify what colour your house is in. The colours provide you with a general guide as to what the vegetation communities may have been present before housing development. For example, you may be in vegetation type 17.

 

Step 3 – Select The Appropriate Vegetation Species List

Follow the links below to the Alice Springs vegetation community list relevant to your property. For example, locate the list called Vegetation-17 and refer to the list of plants we recommend.

From here you can choose the plant species that you might like to plant in your Garden for Wildlife.

 

Step 4 – Locate Your House (Again)

Follow the links below to the maps of your property location i.e. Eastside. Locate your street and house on the land unit map.

 

Step 5 – Identify Your Land Unit

Refer to the legend, which is located on the map and identify what colour your house is in. The colours provide you with a general guide as to what the land units are in the region. For example, you may be in land unit 5.03.

 

Step 6 – Learn About Your Land Unit

Follow the links below to download the individual land unit descriptions relevant to your property. This will highlight the soil descriptions surrounding and including your property location.

Alternatively, you download the full Land Resource and Capability Assessment report and search for the land unit relevant to your property. Each description is two pages and can be printed double-sided.

 

We thank Dave Albrecht for allowing us access to the vegetation community lists and Ruddy Lennartz for allowing us to develop the suburban land and vegetation types for Alice Springs from the Land Resources of Alice Springs Area Map

A great deal of time has gone into developing the original vegetation community maps and vegetation lists. Many thanks to Sarah Wilson, Tim Collins and Sunil Dhanji.

The vegetation maps and land unit maps have been updated by Land for Wildlife (2017) using ArcGIS software.